Friday, May 17, 2019

NICET Facebook Group Post Answers



If you are looking for the answers to the NICET for Fire Alarms Facebook group posts, then you are in the right place!  If you have stumbled upon this article and want to have these questions pushed to your phone or PC instantly, then please by all means join the greatest Fire Alarm forum online.

If you have a questions you want dissected, email us and we will throw it out there.

Question from post on 5-15-19

Based on the International Building and Fire Codes, a fully sprinklered two story office building with a group B occupancy and 11,000 sq' of floor space per level requires what type of fire alarm system?

The 2015 International Building Code table 1004.1.2 states that business type occupancies requires 100 sq' of space per occupant.  11,000 sq' divided by 100 = 110 occupants per floor. The 2015 International Fire Code section 907.2.2, a group B occupancy with greater than 100 persons on a floor above or below the level of exit discharge, a manual fire alarm system shall be required. Since this facility is sprinkled, only one manual pull box would be required in an approved location IF the waterflow activates the occupant notification appliances.

Thursday, May 2, 2019

Smoke Detector Spacing with Beams

Smoke Detector Spacing for Smooth Ceilings


Let's start with the basics of smoke detector spacing.  Based on NFPA 72, there is not a listed spacing and you are instructed to consult with the smoke detector's published documentation.  However, NFPA 72 2016 edition section 17.7.3.2.3.1 states the following, "In the absence of specific performance based design criteria, one of the following requirements shall apply:

  1. The distance between smoke detectors shall not exceed a nominal spacing of 30 feet and there shall be detectors within a distance of one-half the nominal spacing, measured at right angles from all walls or partitions extending upward to within the top 15 percent of the ceiling height.
  2. All points on the ceiling shall have a detector within a distance equal to or less than 0.7 times the nominal 30 foot spacing.
What does this mean?

Number 1 above states you must have a smoke detector within one half the nominal spacing from walls.  One half of 30 feet is 15 feet.  In the image below you will see a total of six yellow circles each with a 30 foot diameter.  These circles represent the area covered by a spot type smoke detector based on a nominal spacing of 30 feet. As required by NFPA 72, we have spaced each detector at 15 feet from walls and 30 feet apart.    

smoke detector spacing for smooth ceilings
Smoke Detector Spacing with a Smooth Ceiling

What about the white areas not covered?

If you notice in the image, there are areas not covered by the yellow circles representing the smoke detector coverage.  This is where NFPA 72 2016 edition section 17.7.3.2.3.1 criteria number two comes into play.  

With a nominal spacing of 30 feet, you must insure that all areas of the ceiling have coverage within 0.7 times this 30 foot amount.  To find this distance, simply multiply 30 feet by 0.7 to get 21 feet.

If you use Pythagorean's Theorem you will come up with a surprising result.  Remember Pythagorean's Theorem is used to find the unknown side of a right triangle and is expressed as A squared + B squared = C squared.  In this case we have a right triangle in each quadrant of the yellow circles.  Each quadrant is 15 feet our and 15 feet up.  We can write this equations as:

15 squared + 15 squared = C squared 
225 + 225 = 450 squared
450 squared = 21.2132 feet

In the image below you will see a cleared depiction of how this all comes together. With this, it is clear that we have met the intent of the standard by mounting our smoke detectors 15 feet from the walls, 30 feet apart and still achieve 0.7 times the nominal spacing (21 feet) coverage at all points of the ceiling.
smoke detector spacing template for 30 feet
Smoke Detector Coverage for 30 Feet

NFPA and Smoke Detector Spacing Distances


The Annex of NFPA 72 provides us with a diagram to assist in smoke detector spacing. Note that smoke detectors are not listed for spacing.  Use the smoke detector's published installation documents and the spacing breakdown below to assist in your design.

NFPA 72 Smoke Detector Spacing Irregular Areas
NFPA 72 Smoke Detector Spacing Diagram



For areas/corridors 10 feet wide, smoke detectors can be spaced at 41 feet.
For areas/corridors 15 feet wide, smoke detectors can be spaced at 39 feet.
For areas 20 feet wide, smoke detectors can be spaced at 37 feet.
For areas 25 feet wide, smoke detectors can be spaced at 34 feet.
For areas 30 feet wide, smoke detectors can be spaced at 30 feet.

Smoke Detector Spacing with Beam Construction


If your ceiling configuration involves beams, your smoke detector coverage can get a bit more tricky.
NFPA 72 2016 edition section 17.7.3.2.4.2 deals with level ceilings with beams. In a nutshell, this is how it breaks down:
  • If the beam depth is LESS than 10% of the overall ceiling height, then smooth ceiling spacing for smoke detection can be applied.  Also note that in this scenario, you can choose to install the smoke detectors on the ceiling or the bottom of the beams. Reference the above text and images for smooth ceiling spacing.
  • If the beams are are equal to or greater than 10% of the overall ceiling height, two scenarios are possible:
    • If the beam depth is equal to or greater than 10% but less than 40%, use smooth ceiling spacing PARALLEL to the beams and one half spacing PERPENDICULAR to the beams.  With this scenario, the smoke detectors can be mounted on the ceiling or the bottom of the beams.
    • If the beam depth is equal to or greater than 40%, a smoke detector shall be placed on the ceiling within each beam pocket.  Keep in mind that more than one smoke detector may be required to cover a given beam pocket.

How to Calculate Smoke Detector Spacing with Beam Construction 


To calculate the beam depth for smoke detector spacing, convert your overall ceiling height into inches.  For example, if your ceiling is 12 feet it would convert to 144 inches.  Take 144 and multiply it by 0.1 to get 10%.  144" x 0.1 = 14.4".  In this case, ant beam depth of 14.4" or more would require an altered smoke detector lay out.  If you want an easier way to work this cal and remember what spacing requirements go with the different percentages, we have you covered.  Download a FREE copy of our Excel Fire Alarm Calculation Tool and use the "SD BEAMS" tab.  All you need to do is input your ceiling height and beam depth in inches and the calculator will give you a color code for which spacing requirement is required (see image below).  Email us with any questions.   




Smoke Detector Spacing in Corridors with Beams 


What do you do if you have a corridor that is equal to or less than 15 feet in width with beams running perpendicular to the length of the corridor?  Consult NFPA 72 2016 section 17.7.3.2.4.2 (4).  This section of the standard allows you to use smooth ceiling spacing and the smoke detectors can be mounted on the ceiling, bottom of the beams or on the sidewall.

Smoke Detector Spacing in Rooms 900 Square Feet or Less


NFPA 72 2016 section 17.7.3.2.4.2 (5) allows the use of smooth ceiling spacing for smoke detection coverage in rooms that are equal to or less than 900 square feet.  You can also install the smoke detector on the ceiling or bottom of the beam. 

Monday, April 22, 2019

Using a Manometer to Test Duct Smoke Detectors

A Manometer is an electronic device commonly referred to as a liquid column hydro-static instrument.  A Manometer measures pressure and vacuum between the actual duct smoke detector's sample tubes. These manometer units can be used with other manufacturer's duct detectors but for this example we will stick with the System Sensor DNR. 

Manometer Testing Duct Smoke DetectorThe Manometer we chose to use for this article is the Duct Checker manufactured by SDI.  The Duct Checker is light weight, portable and battery operated making it easy to get to areas duct smoke detectors are commonly found. Simply connect the two provided hoses with variable size end plugs and power it on.  Once the unit turns on, press down the "hold" button for three seconds to zero out the machine.  Sort of like a scale.  Now press the "unit" button until you arrive at the selection of "inH2O" on the bottom left of the screen.

The Duct Checker comes with two hoses that are designated for specific ports.  One tube is marked as negative and the other positive.  Make sure to place the hose end of the positive into the actual sample tube inlet.  The negative tube will go into the exhaust port. 

With the System Sensor DNR duct detector you will be looking for a reading of anywhere between 0.01 min and 1.11 max.

Duct Checker Manometer from SDi


With this requirement clearly required in NFPA 72 2016 Table 14.4.3.2 section 17 (g)(5), as well as most manufacturer's documentation, you can expect to come across these at some point in your career.  They are not too pricey so I suggest grabbing one from SDi and placing them in your inspection crew's service vehicles.

Voltage Drop For Fire Alarm Circuits

·     Code Requirement for Voltage Drop Calculations?

NFPA 72 2013 Edition Section 7.2.1 - "Where documentation is required by the enforcing authority, the following list shall represent the minimum documentation required for all fire alarm and emergency communication systems, including new systems and additions or alternations to existing systems.", Within this list, you will find #7, Battery Calculations  and #8, Voltage Drop Calculations.

Keep in mind almost all fire alarm control units are 24 volts DC.  Also note that there are a few fire alarm control panels that are 12 volt DC.  Now these panels are typically combination fire and burglar system.  Just remember that the calculations for NAC voltage drops are the same for these systems, however the cut off voltage for a 12 volt system will be roughly half that of a 24 volt system.

·        What is the reason for voltage drop calculations?


NAC voltage drop calculations are critical for determining if your notification appliances will in fact work with the provided head end equipment.  (This is of course based on the installation contractor installing the system per plans and noted wiring distances).  If you perform your NAC voltage drop calculations correctly at the time of design, you will know exactly how many remote power supplies and NAC circuits are needed as well as the wall space requirements and 120 VAC connections required by the electrical contractor.  Keep in mind that this is a requirement of NFPA 72.

·         Voltage Drop Calculation Methods


There are primarily two methods to perform a NAC voltage drop calculation.  These methods are better known as “Point to Point (PTP)” and “End of Line (EOL)”.

·       Point to Point Voltage Drop requires much more math than the “EOL” method.  However, the extra work pays off as this method is more accurate.
  •          Designers generally use this method with a spreadsheet as the math can become tedious
  •          This is the method typically used by panel manufacturers within their own calculation programs
  •          Since it is less conservative of the “EOL” method, it allows for more devices on a circuit.
  •          There are cases of a 30% difference between the PTP and EOL methods
End of Line method is the easiest, quickest calculation
  •          Can be done easily by hand or with a calculator
  •          Results are less accurate that provide lots of head room for future expansion

Starting Voltage and Cut-Off Voltage


UL (Underwriters Laboratories) 864, 9th Edition Standards for Fire Alarm Control Panels:
  •          All panels must have a demonstrated 20.4 VDC panel cut off voltage.

You may be asking, “Where did they come up with 20.4 VDC on a 24 Volt system?”

It is actually quite simple.  20.4 VDC is 85% of 24 VDC. Or like we stated earlier, there are a few 12 VDC systems floating around.  In their case, the demonstrated voltage shall be 10.2 VDC.  Once again, 10.2 VDC is 85% of 12 VDC.

Now, above we mentioned a term “Cut-Off Voltage”.  All fire alarm control units (FACU) have and internal voltage drop.  The voltage at the actual NAC output terminal is always less than 20.4/10.2 volts at cut-off.
  •          This amount of drop varies with every panel.  The variance can be as much as .5 VDC to 2.5 VDC.

Keep in mind that this value is not often found within the panel documentation.  I have found that the easiest way to obtain this value is to contact the panel manufacture and get it in writing.

You now may be asking yourself, “Why is it so critical that I get this value from the manufacturer and not just use the 20.4/10.2 value figured from the 85% set forth by UL 864 9th Edition?”

In order for your NAC voltage drop calculations to be precise and as accurate as possible based on the facts and information provided, you must use the specific panel/power supply terminal cut-off value.

How to determine your NAC Voltage Drop using the End of Line method:

Step #1
Add up the total current draw for your entire notification appliance circuit.  This is based on the manufacture, type (strobe only, horn/strobe, mini horn, audible level, wall, ceiling, etc.)  Make sure to consult with the appliance documentation to get these figures.

Step #2
Add up the total wire length for the run and multiple it by 2 (if class B).  The 2 represents the number of conductors used in the run.

Step #3
Multiply the total wire length times the wire resistance value per foot for a total circuit wire resistance.  The wire resistance per foot can be found in Table 8 “Conductor Properties” in Chapter 9 of the National electrical Code.

Step #4
Using Ohm’s Law we know that Current (I) x Resistance (R) = Voltage (E).  Simply take the total current found in step #1 and multiply it by the resistance found in Step #3.  This will give you the volts dropped.

Step #5
Subtract the volts dropped from the panel/power terminal cut-off voltage to obtain the voltage that will be supplied to the last appliance on the circuit.  This value MUST exceed 16 volts.

Keep in mind that this method is not as accurate as the Point to Point method.  This method assumes that the voltage drop at each appliance will be the same when in reality, they are not.

NEC Table 8 Conductor Properties

Below is an example of an End of Line voltage drop calculation:


End of Line Voltage Drop Fire Alarm

Diagram notes:
  • ·        We will assume that the terminal cut-off voltage is .5 volts below the 20.4 VDC giving us a voltage of 19.9.
  • ·         Use the wire lengths shown in the diagram
  • ·         V1=85mA / V2=75mA / V3=115mA / V4=100mA
  • ·         The circuit is using #12 AWG wire
  • ·         Use the Table 8 of the NEC (National Electric Code) provided previously in this document

Using the Diagram and notes above, can you provide the voltage drop for this circuit using the End of Line method?  Give it a try and when you are ready move on to the next page where we will break it down for you.

End of Line Voltage Drop Calculation Break Down:

Step #1
Add up the total current for all four notification appliances within the circuit.  We know that V1 = 85 mA, V2 = 75 mA, V3 = 115 mA and V4 = 100 mA.  The total of all four of these is 375 mA.

Step #2
Add up the total wire length and multiply it by 2.  We know based on the diagram that the first section is 200 feet, the second section is 150 feet, the third section is 25 feet and the final section is 70 feet.  This totals up to 445 feet x 2 = 890 Total Feet

Step #3
We know from the Table 8 “Conductor Properties” we have a value of 1.98 Ohms/1000 feet of #12 AWG stranded uncoated wire.  To find our resistance for our circuit simply take the total wire length (890 Feet) and divide it by 1000.  This gives us a value of .89.  Now take .89 and multiply it by the 1.98 value found in the NEC Table.  (.89 x 1.98 = 1.7622 Ohms of Resistance)

Step #4
Using Ohm’s Law we know that Current (I) x Resistance (R) = Voltage (E).  Take the total current found in Step #1 (.375) and multiply it by the total found in Step #3 (1.7622).  .375 x 1.7622 = .660825 volts dropped.

Step #5
Finally we need to subtract the .660825 volts from our terminal cut-off voltage.  We know from the previous diagram and notes that we have a terminal cut-off voltage of 19.9 volts.  19.9 volts - .660825 = 19.239 Volts at the last appliance.

Point to Point Voltage Drop Calculation Break Down:

Point to Point Voltage Drop Calculation

Diagram notes:
  • ·         We will assume that the terminal cut-off voltage is .5 volts below the 20.4 VDC giving us a voltage of 19.9.
  • ·         Use the wire lengths shown in the diagram
  • ·         V1=85mA / V2=75mA / V3=115mA / V4=100mA
  • ·         The circuit is using #12 AWG wire
  • ·         Use the Table 8 of the NEC provided previously in this document

Calculation Breakdown:

To perform a point to point voltage drop calculation is basically the same as the End of Line method however; we are going to do a breakdown of each path/appliance.

Calculation #1
  • ·         First wire run section resistance multiplied by the total current for appliance V1, V2, V3 and V4
  • ·         Subtract the total from the terminal cut-off voltage to get the voltage drop for V1.

Calculation #2
  • ·         Second wire run section resistance multiplied by the total current for appliances V2, V3 and V4.
  • ·         Subtract the total of V1 from the terminal cut-off voltage to get the voltage drop of V2

Calculation #3
  • ·         Third wire run section resistance multiplied by the total current for appliances V3 and V4.
  • ·         Subtract the total of V2 from the terminal cut-off voltage to get the voltage drop of V3

Calculation #4
  • ·         Fourth wire run section resistance multiplied by the total current for appliances V4.
  • ·         Subtract the total of V3 from the terminal cut-off voltage to get the voltage drop of V4

If this last value is greater than 16 volts, the circuit should work.

Using the Diagram and notes above, can you provide the voltage drop for this circuit using the Point to Point method?  Give it a try and when you are ready move on to the next page where we will break it down for you.

Calculation # 1
  • ·         200 Feet x 2 = 400 Feet.  400 / 1000 = .4 x 1.98 = .792 Ohms (From the FACU to V1)
  • ·         .792 x .375 (Current of all Appliances) = .297 volts dropped @ V1
  • ·         19.9 (Terminal Cut-Off Voltage) - .297 = 19.603 VDC @ V1

Calculation #2
  • ·         150 Feet x 2 = 300 Feet.  300 / 1000 = .3 x 1.98 = .594 Ohms (From the FACU to V1)
  • ·         .594 x .290 (Current of Appliances V2-V4) = .16356 volts dropped @ V2
  • ·         19.603 (Terminal Cut-Off Voltage) - .16356 = 19.43944 VDC @ V2

Calculation # 3
  • ·         25 Feet x 2 = 50 Feet.  50 / 1000 = .05 x 1.98 = .099 Ohms (From the FACU to V1)
  • ·         .099 x .215 (Current of Appliances V3-V4) = .021285 volts dropped @ V3
  • ·         19.43944 (Terminal Cut-Off Voltage) - .021285 = 19.418155 VDC @ V3

 Calculation # 4
  • ·         70 Feet x 2 = 140 Feet.  140 / 1000 = .14 x 1.98 = .2772 Ohms (From the FACU to V1)
  • ·         .2772 x .200 (Current of Appliance V4) = .05544 volts dropped @ V4
  • ·         19.418155 (Terminal Cut-Off Voltage) - .05544 = 19.3627 VDC @ V4

Both of these calculations are commonly used and widely accepted by your local AHJs.  As you can see the PTP method came up with a total voltage drop of 19.3627 while the EOL method came up with 19.239.  Remember both of these examples used the same parameters.  I personally recommend using the Point to Point method purely based on its accuracy.

How to Apply for NICET Certification Video

NICET Certification - Where to Start

We have had a lot of member from our Facebook Group ask about the NICET certification process, specific to getting started.  The NICET website can be tricky as it is packed with tons of links and  information. To save our readers time, we have complied a video with a complete walk through including: where to click, what to download and most importantly, how to fill out the application for the NICET exam.

Although this video walk through simply covers applying for the NICET exam, you can also find additional information on our website for NICET Practice Exams, NFPA 72 Tabs for references during the NICET exam as well as general information. 

Be sure to comment below if you have any questions with the NICET application process.

Monday, February 19, 2018

NFPA 72 2016 Chapter 26 Changes

NFPA 72 2016 Chapter 26 - Supervising Station Alarm Systems


The following information contains the changes, updates and additions to Supervising Station Alarm Systems found in Chapter 26 of the NFPA 72 2016 edition.  Remember if you see a * make sure to consult the Annex A for additional information.

All information highlighted in this light blue color is NEW to the 2016 edition of NFPA 72.

  • 26.2.1.1 Alarms signals initiating by manual fire alarm boxes, automatic fire detectors, waterflow from the automatic sprinkler system, or actuation of other fire suppression system(s) or equipment shall be treated as fire alarm signals.
  • 26.2.1.2* Except as permitted by 26.2.2 and 29.7.9.2, all fire alarm signals received by a supervising station shall be immediately re-transmitted to the communications center.
  • 26.2.1.3 Fire alarm signals received at the supervising station by a zone or zones shall be re transmitted by zone to the communications center.
  • 26.2.1.4 Fire alarm signals received at the supervising station that are identified as an individual point or points shall be re-transmitted by point identified to the communications system.
Central Station Service Alarm Systems
  • 226.3.4.7 The authority having jurisdiction identified in 26.3.4.2(5) shall be notified within 30 calendar days of the expiration or cancellation by the organization that listed the prime contractor.
  • 26.3.8.3* Supervisory Signals.  Upon receipt of a supervisory signal that is not prearranged, the central station shall perform the following actions:
    1. *Communicate immediately with the persons designated by the subscriber and notify the fire department, law enforcement agency, or both when required by the authority having jurisdiction
    2. Dispatch a runner or maintenance person to arrive within 2 hours to investigate unless the supervisory signal is cleared in accordance with a scheduled procedure determined by 26.3.8.3(1)
    3. Notify the authority having jurisdiction and the subscriber when sprinkler systems or other fire suppression systems or equipment have been wholly or partially out of service for 8 hours.
    4. When service has been restored, provide notice to the subscriber and the authority having jurisdiction of the nature of the signal, the time of occurrence, and the restoration of service when equipment has been out of service for 8 hours or more.

NFPA 72 2016 Chapter 24 - Supervising Station Alarm Systems



Back to the Beginning - NFPA 72 2016 Chapter 3 - Definitions


NFPA 72 2016 Chapter 24 Changes

NFPA 72 2016 Chapter 24 - Emergency Communications Systems (ECS)


The following information contains the changes, updates and additions to Protected Premises for Fire Alarm Systems found in Chapter 23 of the NFPA 72 2016 edition.  Remember if you see a * make sure to consult the Annex A for additional information.

All information highlighted in this light blue color is NEW to the 2016 edition of NFPA 72.

  • 24.3.1.2* Where no listed loudspeakers exist to achieve the intelligibility requirements of the Code for a notification zone, non-listed loudspeakers shall be permitted to be installed to achieve the intelligibility for that notification zone.
Learn more about voice intelligibility here:
  • 24.3.5.4 Where emergency communications systems utilize Class N pathways that are also shared Level 1 or Level 2 pathways as a means to support ancillary functions, devices, or interconnected systems, the shared pathways shall meet the requirements of 23.6.3
  • 24.3.5.4.1 In addition to the requirements of 23.6.3, a risk analysis shall be performed and approved by the AHJ.

NFPA 72 2016 Chapter 24 - Emergency Communications Systems (ECS) - Pathway Survivability


  • 24.3.13.7 Two-way in-building emergency communications systems shall have a pathway survivability of Level 2 or Level 3.
    • Exception: Level 1 shall be permitted where the building is less than 2-hour fire-rated construction.
  • 24.3.13.9.1 Area of refuge emergency communications systems shall have a pathway survivability of Level 2 or Level 3.
    • Exception (1): Level 1 shall be permitted where notification zones are separated by less than 2-hour fire-rated construction.  

NFPA 72 2016 Chapter 24 - Emergency Communications Systems (ECS) - In Building Mass Notification Systems


  • 24.5.14* Mounting of LOC Controls
    • 24.5.14.1 Controls that are intended to be accessed by authorized users shall be mounted in accordance with 24.5.14
    • 24.5.14.2 LOC controls, including switches, microphone, latches and so forth shall be located above the finished floor at a minimum of 36" (91 cm) and a maximum of 48" (122 cm) where the horizontal reach is less then 10" (25 cm)
    • 24.5.14.3 If a horizontal reach of 10" (25 cm) to 24" (61 cm) is required, the maximum elevation shall be limited to 42" (107 cm) above the finished floor and the minimum elevation shall be limited to 28" (71 cm).
    • 24.5.14.4 Text and visual indicators, including lamps, screens, displays, instructions, or labels, associated with control or operation shall be visible within all points of elevation between 40" (102 cm) and 60" (152 cm) above the finished floor.
    • 24.5.14.5 Where controls and information are provided in accordance with 24.5.14.2 through 24.5.14.4, provision of additional or redundant controls shall be permitted within the same vicinity at an elevation or reach other than those indicated.
    • 24.5.14.6 Dimensions other than those identified in 24.5.14.2 through 24.5.14.4 shall be permitted when documented within the emergency response plan that ADA guidelines are not applicable or when otherwise required by the AHJ.
Notifier LOC Panel for Mass Notification
Notifier LOC Panel for Mass Notification
  • 24.5.18.8 Addressable primary textual and graphical visible appliances using signaling line circuits shall meet the performance requirements of section 23.6.
  • 24.5.18.9 Non-addressable primary textual and graphical visible appliance circuits shall meet the performance requirements of section 23.7.

NFPA 72 2016 Chapter 24 - Emergency Communications Systems (ECS) - Area of Refuge


  • 24.10.3 The remote area of refuge stations and the central control point shall communicate with each other via pathways based on their performance capabilities under abnormal or fault conditions in accordance with the requirements for Class A, Class B, Class N, or Class X pathways specified in Chapter 12.
  • 24.10.4 All pathways between a remote area of refuge stations and the central control point shall be monitored for integrity.

NFPA 72 2016 Chapter 24 - Emergency Communications Systems (ECS) - Elevator Emergency Communications Systems


  • 24.11 Elevator Emergency Communications Systems. This was in section 24.5.4 of the 2013 edition of NFPA 72
  • 24.11.3 Inspection and testing of elevator emergency communications systems shall be performed in accordance with ANSI/ASME A17.2, Guide for Inspection of Elevators, Escalators and Moving Walks

NFPA 72 2016 Chapter 24 - Emergency Communications Systems (ECS) - Stairway Communications Systems


  • 24.12* Stairway Communications Systems.
  • 24.12.1 Where required by the building code in force and not included as part of another emergency communications system, a stairway communications systems shall be installed in accordance with 24.12.
  • 24.12.2 The stairway communications system shall be permitted to be integrated with another two-way emergency communications system providing it is installed in accordance with 24.12.  
  • 24.12.3 The stairway communications system shall comprise remotely located communications points and a central control point
  • 24.12.4 Each remote point shall have the capability to communicate with the central control point.  Similar language for Areas of Refuge in Section 24.10.2
  • 24.12.5* Quantity and locations of the remote communications points shall be as required by the building code in force and engineer specifications.
  • 24.12.6* If the central control point is not constantly attended, it shall have a timed automatic communications capability to connect with a constantly attended monitoring location acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction here responsible personnel can initiate the appropriate response.  Similar language for Areas of Refuge in Section 24.12.5.
  • 24.12.7 The physical location of the central control point shall be as designated by the building code in fomrce or the authority having jurisdiction.  Similar language for Areas of Refuge in Section 24.10.6.
  • 24.12.8 The remote communications points shall provide for two-way communications, provide an audible and visual signal to indicate communication has occured, and indicate to the receiver the location sending the signal.  Similar laguage for Areas of Refuge in Section 24.10.7
  • 24.12.9 instructions for the use of the stairway communications system, instructions for summoning assistance via the systems, and written identification, including in braille, of the location shall be posted adjacent to each remote communications point.  Similar language for Areas of Refuge  in Section 24.10.8.

NFPA 72 2016 Chapter 26 - Supervising Station Alarm Systems


NFPA 72 2016 Chapter 23 - Protected Premises Fire Alarm Systems